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Center Director and Advisors

Christine Moe
Christine Moe is the Eugene J. Gangarosa Professor of Safe Water and Sanitation and the Director of the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory University. Her primary appointment is in the Hubert Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, and she holds joint appointments in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health and the Department of Epidemiology. She received her Bachelor's degree in biology from Swarthmore College and her MS and Ph.D. from the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the UNC School of Public Health. She was a post-doctoral fellow in the Division of Viral Diseases at the CDC, and later returned to UNC-Chapel Hill as an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology. She moved to Emory University in 2000.

Dr. Eugene Gangarosa and Dr. Christine Moe Dr. Moe’s research focuses primarily on the environmental transmission of infectious agents - particularly foodborne and waterborne disease. She works on international water, sanitation and health issues and has conducted research in the Philippines, El Salvador, Bolivia and Kenya. Her laboratory research program focuses on noroviruses and includes human challenge studies to examine dose response and determinants of host susceptibility and resistance, studies of viral persistence in the environment, methods to concentrate and detect enteric viruses in water and wastewater and evaluations of the efficacy of disinfectants and handwash agents against noroviruses. Her field research includes studies of dry sanitation systems, assessing determinants of water quality in distribution systems and identifying risk factors for environmental contamination of vegetable crops.

Dr. Moe currently serves on the Health and Scientific Advisory Board for the Institute for Public Health and Water Research. She has been a consultant for WHO and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation on several projects related to water, sanitation and health. She was also a member of the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council, the USEPA Science Advisory Board for Drinking Water and the Research Advisory Council for the American Water Works Research Foundation.

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Eugene J. Gangarosa’s career in public health has spanned over fifty years. Dr. Gangarosa continues to serve as an Emeritus Professor in the Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University. He is a physician internist with specialty training in the clinical, laboratory, epidemiological, and public health aspects of infectious diseases. He received his medical degree and a master’s degree in medical microbiology from the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. He is an internist with Fellowship status in the American College of Physicians (FACP). His entire career has focused on intestinal infections serving consecutively at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research where he conducted research on the pathophysiology of intestinal infections; at the University of Maryland School of Medicine where he held joint appointments in the Departments of Microbiology and Medicine; and at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where he served as Director of the Epidemic Intelligence Services, Chief of the Enteric Diseases Branch and Deputy Director of the Bacterial Diseases Division. At CDC he participated in and supervised field investigations of food-and waterborne disease outbreaks and surveillance of intestinal-infectious diseases. After his retirement from CDC he served as the first dean establishing the American University of Beirut’s School of Public Health. After leaving Beirut, he was appointed Professor of Medicine at Emory University’s School of Medicine continuing his research on intestinal infections in close liaison with the World Health Organization and the Enteric Diseases Branch at the CDC. He has published in peer-reviewed journals on diverse aspects of infectious diseases. In “recognition of his scientific contributions” he received CDC’s Medal of Excellence, its highest award for “advancing the knowledge of the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, treatment, and control of enteric diseases”. For his contributions “building the public health presence at Emory” he received the University’s highest honor, the Thomas Jefferson Award. More recently, he received the University of Rochester’s Humanitarian Award, the American Public Health Association’s Distinguished Lectureship, and the Wade Hampton Frost Award. In 2010, he taught two courses, the Control of Food and Waterborne Diseases, and an undergraduate course in Emory’s Pre-College Program, An Introduction to Public Health. He also provides consulting services on food and waterborne diseases. He is the CEO of the Gangarosa International Health Foundation whose purpose is to promote safe water and sanitation for those most in need.

Rose Salamone Gangarosa is a retired educator who received her BS degree from Nazareth College in Rochester, NY. She attended the Eastman School of Music and taught in schools in Rochester. She taught high school English and served as Principal of the Lahore American School in Lahore, Pakistan. She served as librarian at the American University of Beirut’s School of Agriculture. She is a Board Member of the Gangarosa International Health Foundation working with nongovernmental health organizations promoting safe water and sanitation.

The Gangarosas have endowed two chairs, the Eugene J. Gangarosa Chair in Safe Water, and the Rose Salamone Gangarosa Chair in Environmental Health at the Rollins School of Public Health. They have also endowed the Eugene J. Gangarosa Scholarship Fund that helps fund field practicums for Master of Public Health students. Gene and Rose see these endowments as investments to create the academic environment to attract the best students and faculty whose research will make a difference in achieving safe water and sanitation for the most disadvantaged of our global neighbors.

James Hughes
James M. Hughes, M.D., is Professor of Medicine and Public Health at Emory and Senior Advisor for the Emory Center for Global Safe Water. Prior to joining Emory in 2005, he worked for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, initially as an Epidemic Intelligence Service or EIS officer and ultimately as Director of the National Center for Infectious Diseases from 1992-2005 and as an Assistant Surgeon General in the U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. Hughes received his B.A. and M.D. from Stanford University and trained in internal medicine at the University of Washington, infectious diseases at the University of Virginia, and preventive medicine at CDC. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and is President of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He serves on the Council of the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene and the International Board of the American Society for Microbiology. His interests include emerging infectious diseases, antimicrobial resistance, vectorborne and zoonotic diseases, and foodborne and water-related diseases.

Joanne A. McGriff
Joanne A. McGriff, MD, MPH serves as the Associate Director of Programs for the Center and is originally from Long Island, New York. She completed her undergraduate work at Princeton University and earned her MD degree and Masters in Public Health from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry (NY). Following her graduate studies, Joanne spent several years as a Neuro-Psychiatry post-doctoral research fellow at the U.R. Department of Psychiatry (2004-2007). Her work was mostly in geriatric depression and personality factors influencing treatment. While a fellow, Joanne also applied her public health skills to develop and expand an emergency service program and the community mental health services of a local non-profit in the city of Rochester (2003-2007). Her non-profit management skills continued to flourish when she arrived in Atlanta in 2007. She became involved with ServeHAITI in 2008 as Executive Director, providing leadership and guidance for a staff of 28 at the Saint Vincent DePaul Health Center and seven ServeHAITI US organizational committees. She was also responsible for overseeing another staff of 26 implementing a 4 year USAID-PEPFAR grant in HIV prevention in rural Haiti. A descendent of Haitian parents, Dr. McGriff is fluent in Haitian Creole and has done international medical development work in multiple areas of Haiti.


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Core Faculty (alpha by last name)

Julie Clennon
Dr. Julie Clennon's research interests are in the area of eco-epidemiology of infectious diseases. Dr. Clennon has worked extensively with mapping, spatial statistics (especially cluster detection) and landscape modeling. Her research includes the applications of remotely-sensed imagery for landscape characterization and the comparative utility of satellite imagery for predictive modeling. Her work on spatial and temporal heterogeneity of tropical diseases (e.g., schistosomiasis, malaria, Buruli ulcer) is aimed at determining sustainable prevention and control measures. In addition, she teaches a course in geographical information systems (GIS).

Matthew Freeman is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Health Department at the Rollins School of Public Health and the Rose Salmone Gangarosa Scholar in Safe Water and Sanitation. His work is focused on community- and schools-based water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) programs in the developing world. His interests are in quantifying health and educational impacts of school-WASH, drivers of program sustainability,  equity of access to WASH improvements, and knowledge diffusion through school children.  Several of his projects include applied research and learning in collaboration with development partners, such as CARE, WaterAid, Food for the Hungary, Catholic Relief Services, and Save the Children.  He conducts training and fellowship placement in collaboration with UNICEF.   Matt received his Master of Public Health in Global Environmental Health – a dual degree in environmental and global health – in 2003 from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. In 2000, he received his B.A. in Biology from Wesleyan University. He received his PhD at the University of London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2011. For more about Dr. Freeman's work, please visit his website: Freeman Research Group

Monique Hennink
Dr. Hennink joined the Emory faculty in 2005. Her research focuses on the social and cultural influences on public health issues, with a focus on reproductive health, and more recently on microfinance and health, chronic disease, and water and sanitation issues. Much of her research is based in Africa and Asia. She has extensive experience in conducting and teaching qualitative research, particularly in developing country settings. She is author of two books on qualitative research: International Focus Group Research: A Handbook for the Health and Social Sciences (2007) and Qualitative Research Methods (2010). She teaches research methods and data analysis courses to graduate students and conducts short courses for professionals in developing countries. She has trained researchers, professionals and students in over ten countries in Africa, Asia, Europe and the USA.

Amy Kirby
Dr. Amy Kirby is a molecular microbiologist and epidemiologist whose interests span from the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis to the evolution of pathogens to global transmission cycles of infection.   With a background in agriculture, Dr. Kirby is particularly interested in the intersection of agricultural practices and the transmission of infectious disease.  As such, her work focuses on viruses and bacteria which are transmitted primarily by food and water.  Previously, Dr. Kirby has worked on the regulation of virulence mechanisms in livestock-associated bacteria, as well as the role of biofilm formation in the failure of antibiotic therapies. 

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Juan Leon
Juan Leon is a member of the Center for Global Safe Water. His primary appointment is in the Hubert Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology from Dartmouth College. He received both his PhD in Immunology and Microbial Pathogenesis and Masters of Public Health in Epidemiology from Northwestern University. He moved to Emory University in 2003. http://www.sph.emory.edu/faculty/JLEON3

Dr. Leon’s area of research focuses on the immune response of individuals and populations to parasitic and enteric viral pathogens, especially those involved in foodborne and waterborne disease. He has studied autoimmunity and Chagas disease caused by the parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. With Dr. Rick Rheingans, he is studying the effect of helminth (parasitic worms) infection in Kenyan schoolchildren. With Dr. Christine Moe, he is currently studying immune factors of susceptibility to noroviruses through both clinical trials and epidemiology studies in Peru and Bolivia. In conjunction with the PanAmerican Health Organization (PAHO) and the Bolivian Ministry of Health, he is also assisting the Rotavirus Surveillance project in Bolivia to determine risk factors for pediatric rotavirus infection and the cost of rotavirus to Bolivia prior to the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine. His field research also includes work on the U.S.-Mexico border to identify risk factors for environmental contamination of both domestic and imported fruits and vegetables. His laboratory research focuses on developing new assays to determine immune response to parasitic and enteric viral pathogens. He is also currently studying the persistence of enteric viruses in ground water. He is a member of Sigma Xi-the Scientific Research Society, the American Association of Immunology, the American Society for Virology, the American Public Health Association, and the Global Health Council. 

Karen Levy
Karen Levy is an assistant professor in the departments of Environmental and Occupational Health and Epidemiology at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. She received her BA from Stanford University; as well as her MPH in Epidemiology and MSc and PhD in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Levy’s research interests include antibiotic resistance; rural health; infectious disease; and safe water. She is currently engaged in research on the epidemiology of waterborne disease with an emphasis on household water quality, transmission of enteric waterborne pathogens, and the impacts of climate on the incidence of waterborne disease. In collaboration with the University of Michigan, she is studying the contributions of village-level animal husbandry operations to the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance in northern coastal Ecuador, as well as continuing a 10-year study of diarrheal disease transmission in northern coastal Ecuador, funded by NIAID. Dr. Levy is also investigating linkages between Atlanta’s water distribution system and hospital emergency room admissions for gastrointestinal illness, funded by the US EPA.

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Justin Remais
Dr. Justin Remais leads an international, interdisciplinary project examining the spatial and temporal factors that propagate environmentally mediated tropical diseases in China. His research bridges host, environmental, and parasitic disease phenomena using mathematical and statistical modeling of host-environment interactions, landscape genetics, and field epidemiology to illuminate the fundamental processes of disease spread in changing environments. Much of his research has focused on identifying and quantifying the environmental determinants of Schistosoma japonicum, the causal agent of schistosomiasis in East Asia, at global, regional, and molecular scales with the goal of revealing the mechanistic links between the fate and transport of parasites, patterns of disease, and anthropogenic environmental change. In a newly funded project, Dr. Remais is developing risk models aimed to protect populations from, and prepare populations for, the various health risks associated with climate change, examining the spatial and temporal distributions of multiple health risks that are directly, proximally, and distally related to climate change: heat stress, outdoor air pollution and infectious disease vectors. His teaching includes graduate courses in Global Environmental Health, Climate Change and Health, and Environmental Determinants of Infectious Disease.

Peter Teunis
Peter Teunis has a joint appointment at the Centre for Infectious Disease Control in the Netherlands (National Institute of Public Health, RIVM) and the Department of Global Health.At the Centre for Infectious Disease Control he works as a biostatistician in the Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit, as a member of a group that is charged with developing new methods for infectious disease surveillance. Click here for a link to his faculty page.

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Staff and Fellows

Bethany Caruso is a Research Project Coordinator, Supervisor for the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory University. She spent 1.5 years based in Kisumu, Kenya managing a five-year applied research project that seeks to identify effective, sustainable, and scalable solutions to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) issues in schools. Bethany received her Master of Public Health in Global Health from the Rollins School of Public Health in August, 2009. In 2003, she received her B.A. from Wesleyan University where she pursued an interdisciplinary major, Science in Society, concentrating in Biology and Anthropology. Bethany continues to work for the Center while also pursuing a PhD in the Behavioral Sciences and Health Education Department in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory.

Anna Maria Fabiszewski de Aceituno, Ph.D. is the Lab Manager for the Leon research group in the Center for Global Safe Water. She is also the project manager for a USDA funded study to describe fecal contamination of fresh produce on farms in Mexico near the U.S.-Mexico border. Anna received a Master of Science in Public Health (MSPH) degree from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she spent a year in rural Honduras managing a randomized controlled trial of point-of-use water treatment and its effect on childhood diarrheal disease. In 2003, she received a B.S. in Environmental Science and a minor in chemistry from the Institute for the Environmental at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Mia Gallegos is a Public Health Program Associate for the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory University. She is currently working on a project which aims to promote, monitor, and evaluate the environments that enable sustained provision and use of safe water in health facilities in Honduras, Ghana, and Kenya. Mia graduated from a Master’s program in Development Practice at Emory University. She also holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and human migration from Wake Forest University and a graduate certificate in Community Preparedness and Disaster Management from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mia has worked as a teacher and youth program coordinator in the greater Atlanta area and has worked for Save the Children in Kenya, CARE International in Ethiopia, Habitat for Humanity in Honduras, and the Juvenile Justice Fund in Atlanta. Her research interests include sustainability of school water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions as well as emergency WASH techniques. BACK TO TOP

Alexandra Huttinger is a Public Health Program Associate for the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory University.  Currently she coordinates an EPA sponsored study of distribution system drinking water quality and health outcomes in Atlanta, and manages a study to evaluate the sustainability of membrane filtration in low-resource settings, conducted in Rwanda.  She has contributed to CGSW research in Bolivia through conducting participatory water and sanitation coverage assessments in rural Bolivia, assessing geospatial factors associated with improved water and sanitation, and compiling a GIS database of ecological and social factors contributing to helminth infections in Bolivia.  Alexandra received a Master of Public Health in Global Environmental Health in 2009 from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University.  She received a B.A. in Biology, with a minor in Women, Culture & Development Studies, from U.C. Santa Barbara in 2006.  Her research interests include the control of water-related diseases, ICT for development and ICT for monitoring and evaluation in the water and sanitation sector, and public private partnerships for sustainable water and sanitation.

Kathleen Peters has more than 20 years of experience working in the public, private and academic sectors. She has been working in public health since 2000 and at the Rollins School of Public Health since 2007. While working at the DeKalb County Board of Health's Center for Public Health Preparedness (2000-2006), she worked with faculty and staff at the Rollins School of Public Health to start and maintain the SORT program (Student Outreach and Response Team). SORT was initiated to introduce public health students to local public health practice, including locally based emergency preparedness and response. SORT has since been moved under the RSPH Department of Epidemiology and continues to this day as the Student Outbreak and Response Team. She also helped develop the DeKalb-Fulton Bioterrorism Response Plan, the "Local Heroes" public health social marketing program and assisted in the Hurricane Katrina refugee response at Dobbins AFB. Most recently she worked with the Flour Fortification Initiative at Emory University, a global network of public, private and civic partners working to improve micronutrient malnutrition through fortification of staple foods. She currently supports the faculty and staff of the Center for Global Safe Water as the Research Administrative Assistant.

Suraja Raj is a Public Health Program Associate for the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory University. She currently works on a study funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation aimed at assessing fecal exposure pathways in low-income urban settings. She has contributed to CGSW research through her master’s thesis on intestinal parasites in the human and mountain gorilla populations of the Virunga Volcanoes region of Rwanda. Suraja received her Master of Public Health in Global Health in 2013 from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University and a B.S. in Biology from UCLA in 2010. Her research interests include control of water and sanitation related diseases, human-environment interactions, and knowledge translation.

Katharine Robb is a Public Health Program Associate, Senior , for the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory University.  Currently, she coordinates a study funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation aimed at assessing fecal exposure pathways in low-income urban settings.  She also coordinates studies in Bolivia and Haiti.  She has contributed to CGSW research through her master’s thesis on the influences of household storage on E. coli concentrations in drinking water in northern, coastal Ecuador.  Katharine received a Master of Public Health in Global Environmental Health in 2011 from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University.  She received a B.A. in Environmental Studies with a minor in Women’s Studies from the University of Michigan. Her research interests include the control of water and sanitation related diseases, environmental microbiology and behavioral research in WASH.  

Habib Yakubu is a Public Health Program Associate for the Center for Global Safe Water at Emory University. Currently, he coordinates a study funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation  aimed at assessing fecal exposure pathways in low-income urban settings. His research interests are in water and sanitation in developing countries. Most recently, he has worked in Uganda and Mozambique on developing qualitative and quantitative data collection methods for characterizing microbial drinking water quality and evaluated a Community- Led Total Sanitation program in Ghana.  He received his MSPH in Environmental Science and Engineering from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2011. Habib received his B.Sc in Chemistry in 2001 from the University of Science and Technology in Ghana.


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CGSW Ajunct Faculty(alpha by last name)

Micheal Beach, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Paul Emerson, The Carter Center

Rick Gelting, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Craig Hadley, Emory University, Department of Anthopology

Tom Handzel, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Flemming Konradsen, University of Copenhagen

Eric Mintz, Centers for Disase Control and Prevention

David Nugent, Emory University, Department of Anthopology

Rob Quick, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Andi Shane, Emory University, School of Medicine

Rob Tauxe, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

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